Buckminsterfullerene

 

Buckminsterfullerene (IUPAC name (C60-Ih)[5,6]fullerene) is the smallest fullerene molecule in which no two pentagons share an edge (which can be destabilizing; see pentalene). It is also the most common in terms of natural occurrence, as it can often be found in soot.

Source

Type of fullerene with 60 atoms in the structure of a soccer ball (12 pentagons and 20 hexagons)

Source

A sphere of sixty carbon atoms, also called a buckyball. Named after the architect Buckminster Fuller, who is famous for the geodesic dome that buckyballs resemble.

Source

See fullerenes

Source

See Fullerenes. A broad term covering the variety of buckyballs and carbon nanotubes that exist. Named after the architect Buckminster Fuller, who is famous for the geodesic dome, which buckyballs resemble. [CMP]

Source

A sphere of sixty carbon atoms, also called a buckyball. Named after the architect Buckminster Fuller, who is famous for the geodesic dome that buckyballs resemble.

Source

See Fullerenes. A broad term covering the variety of buckyballs and carbon nanotubes that exist. Named after the architect Buckminster Fuller, who is famous for the geodesic dome, which buckyballs resemble. [CMP]

Source

A fullerene with the chemical formula (C60).

Source

Probably the most famous of the fullerenes, it consists of 60 carbon atoms. Discovered in 1985 by Richard Smalley, Harold Kroto, and Robert Curl for which they won the 1996 Nobel Prize in chemistry. Named in honor of the architect Buckminster Fuller, who designed the geodesic structures that the fullerene resembles.

Source

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


___________________

Refer to this page:

Buckyball

Fullerene

___________________

Related Terms:

 

Note: If a company/institute/site doesn't want to present its own information in nanodic.com, it can sent one e-mail to info@nanodic.com.