Carbon Nanotube

 

Carbon nanotubes (cnts) were discovered by Sumio Iijima in 1991. Carbon nanotubes are fullerene-related structures which consist of rolled graphene sheets. There are two types of CNT: single-walled (one tube) or multi-walled (more tubes). Both of these are typically a few nanometres in diameter and several micrometres to centimetres long.

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Carbon nanotubes (cnts) are allotropes of carbon with a nanostructure that can have a length-to-diameter ratio greater than 10,000,000 and as high as 40,000,000 as of 2004. These cylindrical carbon molecules have novel properties that make them potentially useful in many applications in nanotechnology, electronics, optics and other fields of materials science, as well as potential uses in architectural fields. They exhibit extraordinary strength and unique electrical properties, and are efficient conductors of heat. Inorganic nanotubes have also been synthesized.

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Are cylindrical carbon molecules with properties that make them potentially useful in extremely small scale electronic and mechanical applications. They exhibit unusual strength and unique electrical properties, and are efficient conductors of heat. Inorganic nanotubes have also been synthesized.

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A form of carbon related to fullerenes, except that the carbon atoms form extended hollow tubes instead of closed, hollow spheres. Carbon nanotubes can also form as a series of nested, concentric tubes. Carbon nanotubes can be used as nanometer-scale syringe needles for injecting molecules into cells and as nanoscale probes for making fine-scale measurements. Carbon nanotubes can be filled and capped, forming nanoscale test tubes or potential drug delivery devices. Carbon nanotubes can also be "doped," or modified with small amounts of other elements, giving them electrical properties that include fully insulating, semiconducting, and fully conducting.

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A fullerene having a cylindrical or toroidal configuration.

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Nanotube consisting of one or several graphene sheets rolled up into a seamless tube, forming a single- or multi-walled tube

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Nanotube consisting of carbon

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Hollow nanofibre

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Long, thin cylinders of carbon, discovered in 1991 by S. Iijima. These large macromolecules are unique for their size, shape, and remarkable physical properties. They can be thought of as a sheet of graphite (a hexagonal lattice of carbon) rolled into a cylinder. The physical properties are still being discovered. Nanotubes have a very broad range of electronic, thermal, and structural properties that change depending on the different kinds of nanotube (defined by its diameter, length, and chirality, or twist). To make things more interesting, besides having a single cylindrical wall (Single Walled Nanotubes or swnts), nanotubes can have multiple walls (mwnts)--cylinders inside the other cylinders. Usually referred to as carbon nanotubes, also known as nanorods. Applications for carbon nanotubes include high-density data storage, nanoscale electronics, and flexible solar cells.

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Long, thin cylinders of carbon, discovered in 1991 by S. Iijima. These large macromolecules are unique for their size, shape, and remarkable physical properties. They can be thought of as a sheet of graphite (a hexagonal lattice of carbon) rolled into a cylinder. The physical properties are still being discovered. Nanotubes have a very broad range of electronic, thermal, and structural properties that change depending on the different kinds of nanotube (defined by its diameter, length, and chirality, or twist). To make things more interesting, besides having a single cylindrical wall (Single Walled Nanotubes or swnts), nanotubes can have multiple walls (mwnts)--cylinders inside the other cylinders. Sometimes referred to simply as nanotubes.

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A one dimensional fullerene (a convex cage of atoms with only hexagonal and/or pentagonal faces) with a cylindrical shape. Carbon nanotubes discovered in 1991 by Sumio Iijima resemble rolled up graphite, although they can not really be made that way. Depending on the direction that the tubes appear to have been rolled (quantified by the 'chiral vector'), they are known to act as conductors or semiconductors. Nanotubes are a proving to be useful as molecular components for nanotechnology. [Encyclopedia Nanotech] Strictly speaking, any tube with nanoscale dimensions, but generally used to refer to carbon nanotubes (a commonly mentioned non-carbon variety is made of boron nitride), which are sheets of graphite rolled up to make a tube. The dimensions are variable (down to 0.4 nm in diameter) and you can also get nanotubes within nanotubes, leading to a distinction between multi-walled and single-walled nanotubes. Apart from remarkable tensile strength, nanotubes exhibit varying electrical properties (depending on the way the graphite structure spirals around the tube, and other factors), and can be insulating, semiconducting or conducting (metallic). [CMP]

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A one-dimensional fullerene (a convex cage of atoms with only hexagonal and/or pentagonal faces) with a cylindrical shape.

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Carbon nanotubes (cnts) were discovered by Sumio Iijima in 1991. Carbon nanotubes are fullerene-related structures which consist of rolled graphene sheets. There are two types of CNT: single-walled (one tube) or multi-walled (more tubes). Both of these are typically a few nanometres in diameter and several micrometres to centimetres long.

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Cylindrical tubelike molecule consisting of graphite sheets. They are extremely strong materials and have a good thermal conductivity. Carbon nanotubes are extremely thin (their diameter is about 10,000 times smaller than a human hair). A single walled nanotube (SWNT) is composed of one graphite sheet, a concentrical formation of more than one sheet is named multiwalled nanotube (MWNT).

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Are cylindrical carbon molecules with properties that make them potentially useful in extremely small scale electronic and mechanical applications. They exhibit unusual strength and unique electrical properties, and are efficient conductors of heat. Inorganic molecules have also been synthesized.

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See our Nanotubes and Buckyballs page Copyright Prof. Vincent H. Crespi Department of Physics Pennsylvania State University. And an excellent description of Nanotubes

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See Nanotubes

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Graphite sheet rolled into a tube

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Graphite sheet rolled into a tube

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Graphite sheet rolled into a tube

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A one-dimensional fullerene (a convex cage of atoms with only hexagonal and/or pentagonal faces) with a cylindrical shape.

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See Nanotubes

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A one dimensional fullerene with a cylindrical shape.

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A carbon molecule that resembles a cylinder made out of chicken wire one to two nanometers in diameter by any number of millimeters in length. Accidentally discovered by a Japanese researcher at NEC in 1990 while making Buckyballs, they have potential use in many applications. With a tensile strength 10 times greater than steel at about one quarter the weight, nanotubes are considered the strongest material for their weight known to mankind.

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A cylinder-shaped structure resembling a rolled-up sheet of graphite that can be a conductor or semiconductor depending on the alignment of its carbon atoms. It is 100 times stronger than steel of the same weight, although due to high fabrication costs, widespread commercial use is still distant.

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A fullerene having a cylindrical or toroidal configuration.

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Carbon nanotubes, or cnts, are tubes of carbon atoms less than a nanometer (one billionth of a meter) in diameter. Cnts possess a combination of unique properties that make them highly programmable for a variety of purposes, including flat panel displays. In May 2005 Motorola Labs unveiled the first working 5-inch color video display prototype based on their proprietary carbon nanotube technology.

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