Atomic Force Microscopy

 

A microscope that uses a tiny probe mounted on a cantilever to scan the surface of an object. The probe is extremely close to-but does not touch-the surface. As the probe traverses the surface, attractive and repulsive forces arising between it and the atoms on the surface induce forces on the probe that bend the cantilever. The amount of bending is measured and recorded, providing a map of the atoms on the surface. Atomic force microscopes can achieve magnification of a factor of 5 106, with a resolution of 2 angstroms, sufficient to resolve individual carbon atoms. Also called scanning force microscope.

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The atomic force microscope (AFM) or scanning force microscope (SFM) is a very high-resolution type of scanning probe microscope, with demonstrated resolution of fractions of a nanometer, more than 1000 times better than the optical diffraction limit. The precursor to the AFM, the scanning tunneling microscope, was developed by Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer in the early 1980s, a development that earned them the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1986. Binnig, Quate and Gerber invented the first AFM in 1986. The AFM is one of the foremost tools for imaging, measuring and manipulating matter at the nanoscale. The information is gathered by "feeling" the surface with a mechanical probe. Piezoelectric elements that facilitate tiny but accurate and precise movements on (electronic) command enable the very precise scanning.

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The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a very high-resolution type of scanning probe microscope. The AFM was invented by Binnig, Quate and Gerber in 1986, and is one of the foremost tools for imaging, measuring and manipulating matter at the nanoscale.

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Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a technique for analyzing the surface of a rigid material all the way down to the level of the atom . AFM uses a mechanical probe to magnify surface features up to 100,000,000 times, and it produces 3-D images of the surface.

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An instrument able to image surfaces to molecular accuracy by mechanically probing their surface contours. A kind of proximity probe

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(engineering) A device for mapping surface atomic structure by measuring the force acting on the tip of a sharply pointed wire or other object that is moved over the surface.

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Technique for imaging surfaces by mechanically scanning their surface contours using a microfabricated probe, in which the deflection of a sharp tip sensing the surface forces, mounted on a soft cantilever, is monitored as the tip is moved across the surface

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Is the van der Waals force between the tip and the surface; this may be either the short range repulsive force (in contact-mode) or the longer range attractive force (in non-contact mode).

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A scanning probe microscopy instrument capable of revealing the structure of samples. The AFM uses a sharp metal tip positioned over a conducting or non-conducting substrate and the surface topography is mapped out by measuring the mechanical force exerted on the tip. See scanning probe microscopy.

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An atomic force microscope.

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A device in which the deflection of a sharp stylus mounted on a soft spring is monitored as the stylus is moved across a surface. If the deflection is kept constant by moving the surface up and down by measured increments, the result (under favorable conditions) is an atomic-resolution topographic map of the surface. Also termed a scanning force microscope.

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An instrument able to image surfaces to molecular accuracy by mechanically probing their surface contours. A kind of proximal probe.

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Atomic force microscopy is a technique for analysing the surface of a rigid material all the way down to the level of the atom. AFM uses a mechanical probe to magnify surface features up to 100 000 000 times, and produces 3D images of the surface. The technique is derived from a related technology, called scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The difference is that AFM does not require the sample to conduct electricity, whereas STM does. AFM also works in regular room temperatures, while STM requires special temperature and other conditions. AFM is being used to understand materials problems in many areas including data storage, telecommunications, biomedicine, chemistry, and aerospace. The atomic force microscope was invented in 1986. It uses various forces that occur when two objects are brought within nanometres of each other. An AFM can work either when the probe is in contact with a surface, causing a repulsive force, or when it is a few nanometres away, where the force is attractive.

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Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a technique for analyzing the surface topography with a resolution down to the level of the atom. The AFM detects forces acting on a probe which is in mechanical contact with the surface using a small spring or cantilever. The probe is scanned line by line over the area of interest, whereby the topography is derived from the bending or deflection of the cantilever. The AFM is closely related to another scanning probe technique (SPM), called scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The difference is that AFM does not require a conductive sample, whereas STM does. AFM is being used to understand materials problems in many areas, including data storage, telecommunications, biomedicine, chemistry, and aerospace.

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An instrument able to image surfaces to molecular accuracy by mechanically probing their surface contours. A kind of proximity probe.

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An instrument able to image surfaces to molecular accuracy by mechanically probing their surface contours. A kind of proximal probe. .... A device in which the deflection of a sharp stylus mounted on a soft spring is monitored as the stylus is moved across a surface. If the deflection is kept constant by moving the surface up and down by measured increments, the result (under favorable conditions) is an atomic-resolution topographic map of the surface. Also termed a scanning force microscope. [FS] See How AFM Works, What is an Atomic Force Microscope? And Window on a Small World

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An instrument able to image surfaces to molecular accuracy by mechanically probing their surface contours. Measuring the atomic force acting on its tip as it moves along the surface of the sample.

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Atomic force microscopy is a technique for analysing the surface of a rigid material all the way down to the level of the atom. AFM uses a mechanical probe to magnify surface features up to 100 000 000 times, and produces 3D images of the surface. The technique is derived from a related technology, called scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The difference is that AFM does not require the sample to conduct electricity, whereas STM does. AFM also works in regular room temperatures, while STM requires special temperature and other conditions. AFM is being used to understand materials problems in many areas including data storage, telecommunications, biomedicine, chemistry, and aerospace. The atomic force microscope was invented in 1986. It uses various forces that occur when two objects are brought within nanometres of each other. An AFM can work either when the probe is in contact with a surface, causing a repulsive force, or when it is a few nanometres away, where the force is attractive.

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An instrument able to image surfaces to molecular accuracy by mechanically probing their surface contours. A kind of proximal probe. .... A device in which the deflection of a sharp stylus mounted on a soft spring is monitored as the stylus is moved across a surface. If the deflection is kept constant by moving the surface up and down by measured increments, the result (under favorable conditions) is an atomic-resolution topographic map of the surface. Also termed a scanning force microscope. [FS] See How AFM Works, What is an Atomic Force Microscope? And Window on a Small World

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A type of scanning probe microscopy that maps the topography of an interface by scanning a force sensor over the interface.

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