Nanocomputer

 

Nanocomputer is the logical name for a computer smaller than the microcomputer, which is smaller than the minicomputer. (The minicomputer is called "mini" because it was a lot smaller than the original (mainframe) computers.) More technically, it is a computer whose fundamental parts are no bigger than a few nanometers. For comparison, the smallest part of current state-of-the-art microprocessors measures 45 nm as of February 21, 2007[1]. No commercially available computers that are named nanocomputers exist at this date, but the term is used in science and science fiction.

Source

Information processor whose overall dimensions are less than 100 nm.

Source

A computer with mo­lec­u­lar-sized switching elements. Designs for mechanical nanocomputers which use single-molecule sliding rods for their logic have been proposed. The controller for a nanobot would be a nanocomputer.

Source

Computer whose characteristic length scale is between 10-7.5 and 10-10.5 meters (i.e., between 32 and 0.32 nm, i.e., closer to 1 nanometer than to 1 micrometer or 1 picometer on a logarithmic scale).

Source

A computer built using nanotechnology (manufacturing to molecular specifications). A lower bound on nanocomputing speeds has been set by calculating the speed of an acoustic computer using "rod logics" and messages that travel at the speed of sound; a one-kilogram rod logic, occupying one cubic centimeter, can contain 10^12 cpus each operating at 1000 MIPS for a total of ten thousand billion billion operations per second. Note that rod logics are the nanotech equivalent of vacuum tubes; electronic nanocomputers would be substantially faster. [K. Eric Drexler, Engines of Creation, 1986]

Source

A computer with parts built on a molecular scale.

Source

A computer made from components (mechanical, electronic, or otherwise) built at the nanometer scale. These computers could be many orders-of-magnititude faster than today's, which enables software to take proportional leaps.

Source

A computer made from components (mechanical, electronic, or otherwise) built at the nanometre scale.

Source

A computer made from components (mechanical, electronic, or otherwise) built at the nanometer scale.

Source

A computer made from components (mechanical, electronic, or otherwise) built at the nanometre scale.

Source

 

 

 


Note: If a company/institute/site doesn't want to present its own information in nanodic.com, it can sent one e-mail to info@nanodic.com.