Buckyball

 

Geodesic spheres named for visionary engineer R. Buckminster Fuller, inventor of the geodesic sphere. Buckyballs are strong, rigid natural molecules arranged in a series of interlocking hexagonal shapes, forming structures that resemble soccer balls. One individual buckyball comprises exactly 60 carbon atoms. In 1996, Richard Smalley received the Nobel Prize in chemistry for his discovery of buckyballs.

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One of three known pure forms of carbon (graphite and diamond being the other two) that takes a spherical shape with a hollow interior. Buckyballs, named because they resemble the geodesic domes built by architect Buckminster Fuller, were discovered in 1985 among the byproducts of laser vaporization of graphite in which the carbon atoms are arranged in sheets. Though C60, referring to the number of carbon atoms that make up one sphere, is the most common fullerene, researchers have found stable, spherical carbon structures containing 70 atoms (C70), 120 (C120), 180 (C180), and others. Robert F. Curl Jr. And Richard E. Smalley, both of Rice University in Houston, Texas and Harold W. Kroto of the University of Sussex in England, won the 1996 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for their discovery of buckminsterfullerene, the scientific name for buckyballs.

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A buckyball, or buckminsterfullerene is a spherical or ellipsoidal molecule made out of only carbon atoms. It is a type of fullerene.

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See fullerene.

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A popular name for Buckminsterfullerene.

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Spherical molecules, predominantly constructed of 60 carbon atoms with a soccer ball shape. The carbon atoms are arranged in hexagons (graphite) and pentagons. See Fullerenes.

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C60 molecules & buckminsterfullerene] molecules made up of 60 carbon atoms arranged in a series of interlocking hexagonal shapes, forming a structure similar to a soccer ball. See our Nanotubes and Buckyball page.

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Short for buckminsterfullerene - molecules made up of 60 carbon atoms arranged in a series of interlocking hexagonal shapes, similar to a soccer ball

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A popular name for Buckminsterfullerene.

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[AKA: C60 molecules & buckminsterfullerene] - molecules made up of 60 carbon atoms arranged in a series of interlocking hexagonal shapes, forming a structure similar to a soccer ball. See our Nanotubes and Buckyball page.

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Round (convex) fullerenes ranging in size from 20 to over 500 carbon atoms.

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