Fullerene

 

The fullerene is the reference to a family of carbon allotropes, molecules composed entirely of carbon, in the form of a hollow sphere, ellipsoid, tube, or plane. Spherical fullerenes are also called buckyballs, and cylindrical ones are called carbon nanotubes or buckytubes. Graphene is an example of a planar fullerene sheet. Fullerenes are similar in structure to graphite, which is composed of stacked sheets of linked hexagonal rings, but may also contain pentagonal (or sometimes heptagonal) rings that would prevent a sheet from being planar.

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Closed-cage structure having more than 20 carbon atoms consisting entirely of three-coordinate carbon atoms

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Any closed-cage structure having more than twenty carbon atoms consisting entirely of three-coordinate carbon atoms

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A molecular form of pure carbon that takes the form of a hollow cage-like structure with pentagonal and hexagonal faces. The most abundant form of fullerenes is C60 (carbon-60), a naturally occurring form of carbon with 60 carbon atoms arranged in a spherical structure that allows each of the molecule's 60 atomic corners to bond with other molecules. Larger fullerenes may contain from 70 to 500 carbon atoms. Named for R. Buckminster Fuller for his writing on geodesic domes; also referred to as "buckyballs."

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A Fullerene is a pure carbon molecule composed of at least 60 atoms of carbon. They are cage-like structures of carbon atoms; the most abundant form produced is Buckminster-fullerene (C60), with sixty carbon atoms arranged in a spherical structure. Because a Fullerene takes a shape similar to a soccer ball or a geodesic dome, it is sometimes referred to as a buckyball after the inventor of the geodesic dome, Buckminster Fuller, for whom the Fullerene is more formally named.

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General name for a class of molecules based on pure carbon. Because some Fullerenes take a shape similar to a soccer ball or a geodesic dome, it is sometimes referred to as a buckyball after the inventor of the geodesic dome, Buckminster Fuller (1895-1983), for whom the Fullerene is more formally named. Sometimes referred to as Buckminsterfullerenes.

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Fullerenes are a molecular form of pure carbon discovered in 1985. They are cage-like structures of carbon atoms, the most abundant form produced is buckminsterfullerene (C60), with 60 carbon atoms arranged in a spherical structure. There are larger fullerenes containing from 70 to 500 carbon atoms.

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A molecule containing 60 carbon atoms in a soccer-ball orientation. Also known as buckminsterfullerence, buckyball or c60

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A Fullerene is a pure carbon molecule composed of at least 60 atoms of carbon. They are cage-like structures of carbon atoms; the most abundant form produced is Buckminster-fullerene (C60), with sixty carbon atoms arranged in a spherical structure. Because a Fullerene takes a shape similar to a soccer ball or a geodesic dome, it is sometimes referred to as a buckyball after the inventor of the geodesic dome, Buckminster Fuller, for whom the Fullerene is more formally named.

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Fullerenes are a molecular form of pure carbon discovered in 1985. They are cage-like structures of carbon atoms, the most abundant form produced is buckminsterfullerene (C60), with 60 carbon atoms arranged in a spherical structure. There are larger fullerenes containing from 70 to 500 carbon atoms. [Wid] See What are fullerenes?

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A class of cage-like carbon compounds composed of fused, pentagonal and/or hexagonal sp2 carbon rings.

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A third form of carbon, after diamond and graphite. Can be spherical or tubular in shape.

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