Molecular Assembler

 

A molecular assembler as defined by K. Eric Drexler is a "proposed device able to guide chemical reactions by positioning reactive molecules with atomic precision." Some biological molecules such as ribosomes fit this definition, since while working within a cell's environment, they receive instructions from messenger RNA and then assemble specific sequences of amino acids to construct protein molecules. However, the term "molecular assembler" usually refers to theoretical human-made or synthetic devices. Development of ribosome-like molecular assemblers was funded in 2007 by the British Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council[1] It is clear that molecular assemblers in this limited sense are possible. A technology roadmap project, led by the Battelle Memorial Institute and hosted by several U.S. National Laboratories has explored a range of atomically precise fabrication technologies, including both early-generation and longer-term prospects for programmable molecular assembly; the report was released in December, 2007

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A molecular machine that can be programmed to build virtually any molecular structure or device from simpler chemical building blocks. Analogous to a computer-driven machine shop. [K. Eric Drexler, Engines of Creation, 1986]

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A general purpose device for molecular manufacturing capable of guiding chemical reactions by positioning molecules

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A machine that can make a product atom by atom (molecular nanotechnology). Considered the ultimate manifestation of nanotechnology, the concept is that if parts can be built at the molecular level, the nanofactory can build almost anything, even more versions of itself, which would be its first task. However, it would be advisable to not hold your breath waiting for this machine!

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A nano-robotic device controlled by an onboard computer that can use available chemicals to manufacture nanoscale products. It has been proposed that advanced designs could communicate, cooperate, and maneuver to build macroscale products. Assemblers are much more complex, and probably less efficient, than fabricators.

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In recent popular usage, any nanomachine, usually assumed to offer magical, universal capabilities in an atom-sized package. In the author's usage, any programmable nanomechanical system able to perform a wide range of mechanosynthetic operations. See molecular manipulator, molecular mill.

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A molecular machine that can be programmed to build virtually any molecular structure or device from simpler chemical building blocks. Analogous to a computer-driven machine shop. (See Replicator.)

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A molecular machine that can be programmed to build virtually any molecular structure or device from simpler chemical building blocks. Analogous to a computer-driven machine shop. [K. Eric Drexler, Engines of Creation, 1986]

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A general-purpose device for molecular manufacturing capable of guiding chemical reactions by positioning molecules.

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Also known as an assembler, a molecular assembler is a molecular machine that can build a molecular structure from its component building blocks.

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A general-purpose device for molecular manufacturing, capable of guiding chemical reactions by positioning molecules.

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A general-purpose device for molecular manufacturing capable of guiding chemical reactions by positioning molecules. A molecular machine that can be programmed to build virtually any molecular structure or device from simpler chemical building blocks. Analogous to a computer-driven machine shop.[FS]

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Also known as an assembler, a molecular assembler is a molecular machine that can build a molecular structure from its component building blocks. [ZY]

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A general-purpose device for molecular manufacturing, capable of guiding chemical reactions by positioning molecules.

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A general-purpose device for molecular manufacturing, able to guide chemical reactions by positioning individual molecules to atomic accuracy (e.g. Mechanosynthesis) and to construct a wide range of useful and stable molecular structures according to precise specifications.

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A general-purpose device for molecular manufacturing capable of guiding chemical reactions by positioning molecules. A molecular machine that can be programmed to build virtually any molecular structure or device from simpler chemical building blocks. Analogous to a computer-driven machine shop.[FS]

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Also known as an assembler, a molecular assembler is a molecular machine that can build a molecular structure from its component building blocks. [ZY]

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A small nanomachine designed to construct other nanomachines, including copies of itself. Assemblers were used in Engines of Creation to describe the manufacturing capability inherent in molecular nanotechnology. The word "goo" has never been applied to assemblers; they are included in this list because of the fear that a random "mutation" (in other words, magic or very poor design) could turn assemblers into gray goo. Although a well-designed assembler would have numerous safeguards against uncontrolled replication, such as spontaneous combustion if exposed to oxygen, it now appears that

A chemical device that given certain atomic or molecular inputs (starting materials) can output a specific molecular structure or aggregation.

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Any molecular machine that can be programmed to build virtually any molecular structure or device from simpler chemical building. May be biological (wet nano) or non-organic (dry nano) [after K.Eric Drexler]

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