Synthetic molecular motor

 

Synthetic molecular motors are molecular machines capable of rotation under energy input. Although the term "molecular motor" has traditionally referred to a naturally occurring protein that induces motion, some groups also use the term when referring to non-biological, non-peptide synthetic motors. Many chemists are pursuing the synthesis of such molecular motors [1]. The prospect of synthetic molecular motors was first raised by the nanotechnology pioneer Richard Feynman in 1959 in his classic talk There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom.

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Synthetic molecular motors are molecular machines capable of rotation under energy input. Although the term "molecular motor" has traditionally referred to a naturally occurring protein that induces motion, some groups also use the term when referring to non-biological, non-peptide synthetic motors. Many chemists are pursuing the synthesis of such molecular motors [1]. The prospect of synthetic molecular motors was first raised by the nanotechnology pioneer Richard Feynman in 1959 in his classic talk There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom.

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