Biomimicry

 

Biomimicry (from bios, meaning life, and mimesis, meaning to imitate) is a relatively new science that studies nature, its models, systems, processes and elements and then imitates or takes creative inspiration from them to solve human problems sustainably. Biomimetics is the word most frequently used in scientific and engineering literature that is meant to indicate the process of understanding and applying (to human designs) biological principles that underlie the function of biological entities at all levels of organization. This includes biomaterials, biomechanics, biological systems composed of individuals of one species (e.g. Schools, herds and swarms), or multispecies ensembles. In her 1997 book, "Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature" (ISBN 0-06-053322-6), author Janine M. Benyus introduces biomimicry, presents examples, and explains why the field is important now. She writes, "Our planet-mates (plants, animals and microbes) have been patiently perfecting their wares for more than 3.8 billion years ... Turning rock and sea into a life-friendly home. What better models could there be?"

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Artificial process or material designed to imitate a natural one

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Imitation of biological processes from nature, e.g. Synthesis of artificial vitamins etc.

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