Molecular Beam Epitaxy

 

Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), is one of several methods of depositing single crystals. It was invented in the late 1960s at Bell Telephone Laboratories by J. R. Arthur and Alfred Y. Cho.

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The formation of crystals whose orientation is related to that of the substrate (i.e. Epitaxial) by directing a molecular beam at a crystalline substrate under ultrahigh vacuum conditions.

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Molecular Beam Epitaxy, also known as MBE, is one of a number of methods of thin-film deposition. In solid-source MBE, ultra-pure elements such as gallium and arsenic are heated in separate quasi-knudsen effusion cells until they each slowly begin to evaporate.

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Method used to grow layers of materials of atomic-scale thickness on surfaces.

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Molecular beam epitaxy

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Process used to make compound (multi-layer) semiconductors. Consists of depositing alternating layers of materials, layer by layer, one type after another (such as the semiconductors gallium arsenide and aluminium gallium arsenide).

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[MBE] Process used to make compound [multi-layer] semiconductors. Consists of depositing alternating layers of materials, layer by layer, one type after another [such as the semiconductors gallium arsenide and aluminum gallium arsenide].

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Process used to make compound (multi-layer) semiconductors. Consists of depositing alternating layers of materials, layer by layer, one type after another (such as the semiconductors gallium arsenide and aluminium gallium arsenide).

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Molecular beam epitaxy

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[MBE] Process used to make compound (multi-layer) semiconductors. Consists of depositing alternating layers of materials, layer by layer, one type after another (such as the semiconductors gallium arsenide and aluminum gallium arsenide).

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