Raman spectroscopy

 

Raman spectroscopy (pronounced: [r?.m?N] S-) is a spectroscopic technique used in condensed matter physics and chemistry to study vibrational, rotational, and other low-frequency modes in a system.[1] It relies on inelastic scattering, or Raman scattering, of monochromatic light, usually from a laser in the visible, near infrared, or near ultraviolet range. The laser light interacts with phonons or other excitations in the system, resulting in the energy of the laser photons being shifted up or down. The shift in energy gives information about the phonon modes in the system. Infrared spectroscopy yields similar, but complementary, information.

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Analysis of the intensity of Raman scattering of monochromatic light as a function of frequency of the scattered light; the information obtained is useful for determining molecular structure

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Analysis of the intensity of Raman scattering of monochromatic light as a function of frequency of the scattered light; the information obtained is useful for determining molecular structure

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Spectroscopy in which the Raman effect is used to investigate molecular energy levels

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Analysis of the intensity of Raman scattering, in which light is scattered as it passes through a material medium and suffers a change in frequency and a random alteration in phase. The resulting information is useful for determining molecular structure.

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