Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy

 

Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is a powerful technique for viewing surfaces at the atomic level. Its development in 1981 earned its inventors, Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer (at IBM Zürich), the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1986[1][2]. STM probes the density of states of a material using tunneling current. For STM, good resolution is considered to be 0.1 nm lateral resolution and 0.01 nm depth resolution[3]. The STM can be used not only in ultra high vacuum but also in air and various other liquid or gas ambients, and at temperatures ranging from near 0 kelvin to a few hundred degrees Celsius[4].

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Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is used to obtain atomic-scale images of metal surfaces.

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An instrument able to image conducting surfaces to atomic accuracy; has been used to pin molecules to a surface

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Electron spectra are obtained by using electronic derivation of the tunneling current in STM.

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Technique for revealing the apparent electron-density-related atomic structure of surfaces, using a needle-like probe near the object under observation; a tunnelling current, which is measured, is generated by altering the potential at the tip of the probe; a 3D representation of the sample surface is generated by rastering the surface of the object and mapping the distance for constant current level at various points

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Is the tunnelling current between a metallic tip and a conducting substrate which are in very close proximity but not actually in physical contact.

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A scanning probe microscopy instrument capable of revealing the structure of samples. The STM uses a sharp metal tip positioned over a conducting substrate with a small potential difference applied between them. The gap between the tip and substrate surface is small enough so that electrons can tunnel between the tip and the surface. The tip is then scanned across the surface and adjusted to keep a contact current flowing. By recording the tip height at each location a "map" of the sample surface is obtained.

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A scanning tunneling microscope.

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An instrument able to image conducting surfaces to atomic accuracy; has been used to pin molecules to a surface.

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A device that obtains images of the atoms on the surfaces of materials - important for understanding the topographical and electrical properties of materials and the behaviour of microelectronic devices. The STM is not an optical microscope; instead it works by detecting electrical forces with a probe that tapers down to a point only a single atom across. The probe in the STM sweeps across the surface of which an image is to be obtained. The electron shells, or clouds, surrounding the atoms on the surface produce irregularities that are detected by the probe and mapped by a computer into an image. Because of the quantum mechanical effect called 'tunnelling' electrons can hop between the tip and the surface. The resolution of the image is in the order of 1nm or less.

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Scanning tunnelling microscope

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A scanning probe technique where a local metallic probe is scanning a conductive surface. The topographic information is deduced from the tunnel current which runs between probe and sample without mechanical contact. The electron shells, or clouds, surrounding the atoms on the surface produce irregularities that are detected by the probe and mapped by a computer into an image.

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An instrument able to image conducting surfaces to atomic accuracy; has been used to pin molecules to a surface. [NTN]

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A device that obtains images of the atoms on the surfaces of materials - important for understanding the topographical and electrical properties of materials and the behaviour of microelectronic devices. The STM is not an optical microscope; instead it works by detecting electrical forces with a probe that tapers down to a point only a single atom across. The probe in the STM sweeps across the surface of which an image is to be obtained. The electron shells, or clouds, surrounding the atoms on the surface produce irregularities that are detected by the probe and mapped by a computer into an image. Because of the quantum mechanical effect called 'tunnelling' electrons can hop between the tip and the surface. The resolution of the image is in the order of 1nm or less.

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Scanning tunnelling microscope

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An instrument able to image conducting surfaces to atomic accuracy; has been used to pin molecules to a surface. [NTN]

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A type of scanning probe microscopy that maps the local electrical properties of an interface.

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Refer to this page:

Atomic Force Microscopy

Nano-Optics

Scanning Probe Microscopy

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Related Terms:

 

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