Transmission Electron Microscopy

 

Those forms of electron microscopy in which electrons are transmitted through the object to be imaged, suffering energy loss by diffraction and to a small extent by absorption.

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Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a microscopy technique whereby a beam of electrons is transmitted through an ultra thin specimen, interacting with the specimen as they pass through. An image is formed from the interaction of the electrons transmitted through the specimen, which is magnified and focused by an objective lens and onto an imaging device, such as a fluorescent screen, as is common in most tems, on a layer of photographic film, or to be detected by a sensor such as a CCD camera. The first TEM was built by Max Knoll and Ernst Ruska in 1931, with this group developing the first TEM with resolving power greater than that of light in 1933 and the first commercial TEM in 1939.

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Technique using electrons that can image through very thin samples in transmission or, for thicker samples, the outline profile in projection

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Method for producing magnified images or diffraction patterns by passing an electron beam through a specimen

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1) transmission electron microscopy. What you do is take the sample, grind it up, then place an aqueous suspension of it on a grid where the electron microscope can get at it.

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The use of electron high-energy beams to achieve magnification close to atomic observation. See electron microscopy.

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Tunnelling electron microscope

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A collimated monochromatic electron beam is focused on the sample surface via a magnetic lens system. Electrons interact with atoms of the sample resulting in a specific particle and radiation emission. The sample is thin enough (several 100 nm thick) to be electron transparent. The transmission is detected providing local material information with spatial resolution. A HRTEM (high resolution TEM) provides images with atomic resolution.

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A method of producing images of a sample by illuminating the sample with electronic radiation (in a vacuum), and detecting the electrons that are transmitted through the sample.

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