Soft Lithography

 

In technology, soft lithography refers to a family of techniques for fabricating or replicating structures using "elastomeric stamps, molds, and conformable photomasks" (in the words of Rogers and Nuzzo, p. 50, as cited in "References"). It is called "soft" because it uses elastomeric materials most notably PDMS. Soft lithography is generally used to construct features measured on the micrometer to nanometer scale. According to Rogers and Nuzzo (2005), development of soft lithography expanded rapidly during the period 1995 to 2005.

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See nanoimprinting.

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A term for a collection of techniques (nanocontact printing, nanoimprinting, etc.) That are simple in concept and based around nanostructured forms, or moulds.

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Generic term for a class of lithographic techniques to produce structures on the microscopic and nanoscopic scale. The most common method are Microcontact Printing (µcp), Micromolding in Capillaries (MIMIC), Microtransfer Molding (TM) and Replica Molding. All techniques use a stamp made of PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) for the structure transfer, in the case of µcp, the stamp is wetted by an ink, which forms a self-assembled monolayer when pressed on a sample surface. In a final step this structured monolayer is used as a resist against etching. With this method structures of several 10 nm in width can be produced.

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A process that uses polymers for molding and printing micro and nano structures

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A term for a collection of techniques (nanocontact printing, nanoimprinting, etc.) That are simple in concept and based around nanostructured forms, or moulds.

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A method of surface patterning that makes use of flexible (elastomeric) stamps, molds or masks.

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