Dendrimer

 

Dendrimers are repeatedly branched molecules. The huge number of papers on dendritic architectures such as dendrimers, dendronized, hyperbranched and brush-polymers has generated a vast variety of inconsistent terms and definitions making a clear and concise unfolding of this topic highly difficult. The purpose of this section is to provide the vocabulary required for the description of chemical and physical phenomena as well as application aspects associated with the research in the area of dendritic molecules.

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A dendrimer is a tree-like highly branched polymer molecule (Greek dendra = tree). Dendrimers are synthesized from monomers with new branches added in discrete steps ("generation") to form a tree-like architecture. A high level of synthetic control is achieved through step-wise reactions and purifications at each step to control the size, architecture, functionality and monodispersity. Several different kinds of dendrimers have been synthesized utilizing different monomers and some are commercially available. This picture shows a "3rd generation" polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer. Dendrimers are of particular interest for cancer applications because of their defined and reproducible size, but more importantly, because it is easy to attach a variety of other molecules to the surface of a dendrimer. Such molecules could include tumor-targeting agents (including but not restricted to monoclonal antibodies), imaging contrast agents to pinpoint tumors, drug molecules for delivery to a tumor, and reporter molecules that might detect if an anticancer drug is working.

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A dendrimer is a molecule with a form like the branches of a tree. The name comes from the Greek dendra, meaning "tree." In 1979, the first dendrimer was synthesized by D.A. Tomalia and other researchers at the Dow Chemical Company, and dendrimers have been studied all over the world because their form is unique.

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Macromolecule built up from a monomer, with new branches added to each existing branch.

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Synthetic, three-dimensional macromolecule built up from a monomer, with new branches added in a step-by-step fashion until a symmetrical branched structure is created

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A polymer with multiple branches. Dendrimers are synthetic 3-D macromolecular structures that interact with cells, enabling scientists to probe, diagnose, treat, or manipulate cells on the nanoscale. From the Greek word dendra, meaning tree.

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A dendrimer is an artificially manufactured or synthesized molecule built up from branched units called monomers. Such processes involve working on the scale of nanometers. Technically, a dendrimer is a polymer, which is a large molecule comprised of many smaller ones linked together.

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A dendrimer (from Greek dendra for tree) is an artificially manufactured or synthesized branched molecule built up from monomers. Basically, a dendrimer is a polymer and it's name is derived from "dendritic polymer".

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From the Greek word dendra - tree, a dendrimer is polymer that branches. [Encyclopedia Nanotech] "...a tiny molecular structure that interacts with cells, enabling scientists to probe, diagnose, cure or manipulate them on a nanoscale." Invented by Professor Donald Tomalia from Central Michigan University. [smalltimes] See this article for a great explanation Dendrimers: Branching out into new realms of molecular architecture.

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Artificial molecule structure that has tiny branches or sprigs sprouting from it, which allow it to carry drug molecule

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A dendrimer is an artificially manufactured or synthesized molecule built up from branched units called monomers. Such processes involve working on the scale of nanometers. Technically, a dendrimer is a polymer, which is a large molecule comprised of many smaller ones linked together.

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From the Greek word dendra - tree, a dendrimer is polymer that branches. [Encyclopedia Nanotech] "...a tiny molecular structure that interacts with cells, enabling scientists to probe, diagnose, cure or manipulate them on a nanoscale." Invented by Professor Donald Tomalia from Central Michigan University. [smalltimes] See this article for a great explanation Dendrimers: Branching out into new realms of molecular architecture.

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From the Greek word dendra - tree, a dendrimer is polymer that branches.

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From the Greek word for tree, a polymer with branching parts invented by Donald Tomalia in the late 1970s. Currently used in medical research for use as a molecular "toolkit" for targeted drug delivery.

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A polymer in which the atoms are arranged in many branches and subbranches along a central backbone of carbon atoms. Also called cascade molecule.

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Refer to this page:

Generation

Dendron

Monodisperse

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Related Terms:

 

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