Nanomaterial

 

Nanomaterials can be defined as materials which have structured components with at least one dimension less than 100nm. Materials that have one dimension in the nanoscale are layers, such as a thin films or surface coatings. Some of the features on computer chips come in this category. Materials that are nanoscale in two dimensions include nanowires and nanotubes. Materials that are nanoscale in three dimensions are particles, for example precipitates, colloids and quantum dots (tiny particles of semiconductor materials). Nanocrystalline materials, made up of nanometre-sized grains, also fall into this category.

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Nanomaterials are applications with morphological features smaller than a one tenth of a micrometre in at least one dimension.[1] Despite the fact that there is no consensus upon the minimum or maximum size of nanomaterials, with some authors restricting their size to as low as 1 to ~30 nm, a logical definition would situate the nanoscale between microscale (0.1 micrometre) and atomic/molecular scale (about 0.2 nanometers). See Figure "Classification of nanostructured materials".

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A generic term for nanocomposites, nanoparticles, nanofilms, nanowires, etc.

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Nanomaterials is the study of how materials behave when their dimensions are reduced to the nanoscale. It can also refer to the materials themselves that are used in nanotechnology.

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Nanomaterials is the study of how materials behave when their dimensions are reduced to the nanoscale. It can also refer to the materials themselves that are used in nanotechnology.

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Material with one or more external dimensions, or an internal structure, on the nanoscale, which could exhibit novel characteristics compared to the same material without nanoscale features

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Nanoscale particles, films, and composites designed and assembled in controlled ways.

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Can be subdivided into nanoparticles, nanofilms and nanocomposites. The focus of nanomaterials is a bottom up approach to structures and functional effects whereby the building blocks of materials are designed and assembled in controlled ways. [oxonica]

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Nanomaterials can be defined as materials which have structured components with at least one dimension less than 100nm. Materials that have one dimension in the nanoscale are layers, such as a thin films or surface coatings. Some of the features on computer chips come in this category. Materials that are nanoscale in two dimensions include nanowires and nanotubes. Materials that are nanoscale in three dimensions are particles, for example precipitates, colloids and quantum dots (tiny particles of semiconductor materials). Nanocrystalline materials, made up of nanometre-sized grains, also fall into this category.

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Nano materials relates to the use of nano structures to generate and improve the material properties.

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Can be subdivided into nanoparticles, nanofilms and nanocomposites. The focus of nanomaterials is a bottom up approach to structures and functional effects whereby the building blocks of materials are designed andassembled in controlled ways. [Oxonica]

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Although a broad definition, we categorise nanomaterials as those which have structured components with at least one dimension less than 100nm. Materials that have one dimension in the nanoscale (and are extended in the other two dimensions) are layers, such as a thin films or surface coatings. Some of the features on computer chips come in this category. Materials that are nanoscale in two dimensions (and extended in one dimension) include nanowires and nanotubes. Materials that are nanoscale in three dimensions are particles, for example precipitates, colloids and quantum dots (tiny particles of semiconductor materials). Nanocrystalline materials, made up of nanometre-sized grains, also fall into this category. Some of these materials have been available for some time; others are genuinely new. The aim of this chapter is to give an overview of the properties, and the significant foreseeable applications of some key nanomaterials.

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